July 1, 2022, 8:36 am


Staff Correspondent

Published:
2021-06-23 14:07:27 BdST

COVID-19 pandemicBD reports 85 more deaths, 5,727 new cases


Bangladesh on Wednesday saw 85 deaths in the span of 24 hours from deadly Covid-19 virus which is the highest single day death toll in 55 days. 

The country had registered 88 deaths on 29 April this year. 

Meawhile, with the detection of 5,727 cases, country recorded the highest number of cases registered in a single day since 13 April. 

The total caseload reached 8,66,877 while the death toll creeped up to 13,787. 

The daily infection rate continued to climb as it went past 20% (exact rate 20.27%). 

A total of 28,256 samples were tested in 554 labs within the last 24 hours. 

According to the daily Covid-19 bulletin issued by the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS), the death rate remained unchanged at 1.59%.

Among the latest day's victims, 55 were men, and 30 were women. Of the victims, 74 died in different hospitals across the country, 10 died at home while another was declared dead on arrival at the hospital. 

Of the deceased, the highest number of 36 deaths were recorded in Khulna division followed by Dhaka and Rajshahi with 19 and 18 deaths respectively. Seven died in Chattogram division, three in Mymensingh and one each in Barishal and Rangpur divisions. 

Also, 3,168 patients were declared free of Covid-19 during the last 24 hours, with a 91.31% recovery rate. So far, 7,91,553 people have recovered from the disease. 

The Covid-19 victims' gender breakdown shows that 9,865 of the total deceased across the country were men and 3,922 were women.

The country's maiden cases were reported on 8 March last year and the first death from the virus was reported on 18 March.

As of Wednesday, 3,899,731 people globally succumbed to the viral disease and so far 179,997,274 people contracted the virus, according to data provided by Worldometer. 

Unauthorized use or reproduction of The Finance Today content for commercial purposes is strictly prohibited.


Popular Article from COVID-19